Dive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia Pacific
Dive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia Pacific   Dive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia Pacific
 
Dive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia Pacific
 
Dive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia Pacific




Kwajalein Island


Dive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificDive Adventures - Australias Leading Scuba Diving Travel Experts, Australia and Asia PacificWreck Dive Guam - Pots and pans from a wrecked ship - Dive Adventures Australia

 

Micronesia

 

Local Destinations

   

Bikini Lagoon
Guam
Kosrae
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
Palau
Pohnpei
Truk
Yap

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Kwajalein Island, located 2,400 miles southwest of Hawaii is the largest island in the Marshall Islands. Kwajalein Atoll is the largest in the world circling a lagoon of nearly 850 square miles. At one time Kwajalein was the most important base in the Marshalls for support of the Japanese war effort.

As of the 1st January 2006, Kwajalein will be open to the general public. Kwajalein, and nearby Roi—Namur are US military bases for radar and tracking. The signs of WWII on land are almost all but erased, but underwater there are many shipwrecks and some aircraft wrecks that are popular dive sites. Given the war history of the area, it is a very desirable destination for divers who love the wrecks or enjoy the lure of lush tropical reefs.

Scattered throughout the lagoon, the wrecks vary in depth from very shallow to over 170' and are loaded with various types of cargo including airplanes, ammunition, cars and other assorted goods. The underwater world of Kwajalein is a well-kept secret. Kwajalein is a wreck divers dream. The Island is currently leased to the U.S. Army and until now has been closed to the general public.

Visitors to the Marshall Islands can now enjoy the perfect spot for scuba diving, sport fishing, bird watching and enjoying tropical island living in one of the most beautiful places in the Pacific. The Oleanda is the first and only dedicated vessel to operate diving, fishing & kayaking expeditions exclusively in Marshall Island waters and now for the first time Kwajalein.

 

Scuba Diving in Kwajalein


The military history of Kwajalein has made tourism almost non-existent and has kept the environment in pristine condition. Kwajalein lagoon offers excellent wreck diving of mostly Japanese ships, a few planes and a very large German heavy cruiser, the Prinz Eugen.

 

NOTE: Kwajalein is not open to recreational divers all the time - please check with Dive Adventures before you wish to travel.

Some of the popular Dive sites include:

Prinz Eugen - Sunk on December 22, 1946 after surviving the Bikini Atoll atomic tests. This German warship, which engaged HMS Hood and HMS Prince of Wales with the Bismarck, was surrendered to British in Copenhagen on May 7 1945 and then turned over to US forces in Germany. The ship was sailed to the US and was converted into a target ship IX-300. After the blast, Prinz Eugen was one of 50 ships that survived the air and underwater bursts and was then towed to Kwajalein. There she was inspected for radiation and bomb damage.

The ship had been weakened by the blast and began to take on water. Overnight it developed a 35-degree list and then sank. Its screws and rudder are partially exposed above water. One of the screws was removed and returned to Germany. Divers anchor on the wooden wreck of small hull in 30 feet of water opposite the screws. The hull rests against the reef, but there is an opening at the 90 foot level, just forward of the bridge.

The bow is at 110 feet and you can swim under it. There is easy access to most of the ship. The crew’s quarters are accessible with remains of bunks and personal effects. The mess area contains crockery; a latrine, Machinery and fire-fighting gear is suspended on the deck. Amidships much has fallen onto the seabed including some AA guns and their mounts. Some items have been recovered from the bridge.

The armament two large turrets with twin 8 inch barrels. Large 4.1 inch guns, dual and quad AA guns are almost all still intact. Port torpedo tubes have torpedoes in them. The interior structure is fairly intact and is safe for exploration. The ship's armament is intact; the 8-inch main batteries fell from their mountings when the Prinz Eugen capsized in 1946, and now lie upside down on the bottom. Smaller secondary armament and anti-aircraft weapons, although heavily encrusted with marine growth, are visible all along the length of the ship.

The portside torpedo launcher still remains, and a room nearby contains a large rack of torpedoes which should be considered dangerous and not disturbed. Although the bridge and superstructure are crushed against the bottom, many interesting items can be seen both on the vessel and on the sandy bottom beneath it.

Manta rays, large grouper, and grey reef sharks are common here, the marine life nicely rounding out the scenery afforded by this once proud warship.

The Asakaze Maru - Sunk by a large group of American aircraft on December 3, 1943. Hit with three 1,000 lb bombs and five hours later the ship sunk. Around the boat deck are several empty gun mounts. There is a inch gun on the bow and a large MG on starboard side of the wheelhouse. A bomb blew apart the stern. Another dropped through the engine room ¼ skylight and totally mangled the area. The smokestack is leaning over to the starboard side. The Asakaze has several holds, all offering great exploration opportunities.

Akibassan Maru - Sunk on January 31 from three direct hits from planes and sank in five minutes. Discovered in 1965 she lies on a 160-foot bottom. Referred to as "P-buoy" because of the large buoy near the wreck. In the No. 1 Hold, piles of various types of Japanese beer bottles, shoes and broken wooden crates. Burned planks indicate a fire ripped through the compartment. The bow has an anchor, winch and gun platform but no gun. The forecastle was the crew's quarters, and many personal effects have been found there over the years.

Aft compartments contain a western style bathtub with its end chipped off by a bomb that was later removed. The No. 2 Hold has seaplane wings and pontoons. No 4 Hold has large drums, lumber and other things. Easy access to stern cabins with the equipment and machinery.

Many types of large fish in the vicinity. Groupers are found at the stern.


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